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Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018

Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018

Close friend Emeril Lagasse wrote Andrés’ tribute

Emeril Lagasse describes Andrés as a culinary icon, a brilliant restaurateur, and a hero

Time magazine has released its annual list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. For the second time in six years, chef José Andrés was named as an honoree alongside 99 others, including snowboarding prodigy Chloe Kim, rapper Cardi B, and the students of Parkland, Florida.

Andrés’ tribute was written by his dear friend Emeril Lagasse, a James Beard Award-winning New Orleans-style chef beloved for his Creole and Cajun cuisine. The 58-year-old describes Andrés as a culinary icon, a brilliant restaurateur, and a hero.

“His relief efforts in natural-disaster-stricken places like Haiti and Puerto Rico have had profound and lasting effects. By providing meals to people in dire and desperate situations, he not only ends their hunger — he offers them a powerful sense of hope for the future,” Lagasse wrote.

Andrés and his nonprofit World Central Kitchen fed several million people in Puerto Rico, Texas, and Mexico City in 2017 in the wake of hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes. He also cooked meals for Californians displaced by violent wildfires. The 48-year-old native of Spain is a huge advocate for immigration, and the James Beard Foundation even recently named him “Humanitarian of the Year.”

If you thought this guy couldn’t get any better, you’re wrong. Andrés is also slated to receive an honorary doctorate degree in May from Tufts University for his public service, according to GrubStreet. It’s no wonder Lagasse calls his pal “exceptional, generous, compassionate.” Do you need another reason to love José Andrés? Here are 18!


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.


Time Names José Andrés One of Its 100 Most Influential People of 2018 - Recipes

When you think of Chinese businessmen in the Philippines perhaps Henry Sy is the first to come to mind. He is the founder of the SM Group which owns malls and supermarkets throughout the country. Likewise Tony Tan, the founder of Jolibee, is also a Chinese businessman whose fast food empire continues to expand nationally and internationally. With a new wave of Chinese migrants comes the same woes experienced by Filipinos in 1917. Many of the Chinese workers are working illegally while posing as tourists. Investors have caused housing prices to rise forcing many Filipinos out of the market. The government lacks the will to do anything about what some have called a creeping Chinese invasion.

This cartoon is very interesting in light of the recent pronouncement by Duterte that it is ok for PNP officers to take small gifts of little value if they are offered. Former PNP Chief Bato and current Chief Albayalde both admitted to taking gifts, food mostly, during "special occasions" which is exactly what is being depicted in this cartoon. The politician is being offered a ham and some fruit on a special occasion and the implication is that this is an indirect bribe. Perhaps Duterte has not taken gifts from Chinese businessmen but he has met with plenty of them in Malacañang and their influence on him cannot be denied. Many of his closest friends, like Jose Kho and Dennis Uy, are Chinese businessmen.

Is there anyone who does not know that China is a major source for illegal drugs in the Philippines? Duterte has said it, the PNP has said it, and the PDEA has said it. Most drugs come from China and even with the drug war there has been no let up. They hide drugs in biscuit cans, pallets, vans, and even magnetic lifters and they sneak on through customs with no problem. When the drugs are on the street the police are incapable to prevent their distribution. Some police are even involved in selling drugs! And who has taken the heat in the drug war? The small fish. "The lower classes are made to suffer the penalty" of arrest, imprisonment, or even death at the hands of the PNP or motorcycle assassins. The big fish like Peter Lim swim away.

As of this writing Duterte is on his 5th visit to China. Chinese warships are making passage in the WPS. The Chinese military continues to build on islands that belong to the Philippines. A Chinese firm is leading the rebuilding of Marawi while Duterte's Chinese businessman friend Dennis Uy has been awarded a contract for a 3rd telecom. Chinese loans have been promised to finance Duterte's Build Build Build initiative. Everywhere you look in the Philippines it's China, China, China! But that is nothing new. As these cartoons demonstrate the problems with Chinese merchants is quite old as are charges of racism. Anyone who brings up the issues about the Chinese or questions China's true motives in wishing to be friends with the Philippines is accused of sinophobia.

For good or for ill the Chinese will continue to influence and dominate business, finance, and politics in the Philippines. Filipinos will have to get use to it. Perhaps they could learn a thing or two from the Chinese work ethic.